What’s the point (of translation)?

February 19th, 2012 by Hannah

“English is the most dominant global language ever. So why are we at Desiring God doing so much work to translate our resources into other tongues? Why not just spend the same amount of time, money, and effort teaching people to read our English resources rather than doing the hard (and sometimes messy) work of translation?”

So starts Tyler Kenney’s recent post on the Desiring God blog. It is an important question, and especially important for Wycliffe as an organisation which prioritises translation into the minority languages of the world.

Translation is embedded in Christian history. From the very start, as the apostles wrote of Jesus’ ministry, they translated his words into Greek as they wrote, and those words have been shared since then in translations. In fact, translation is even more fundamental – as Kenney points out, “Jesus’ incarnation was an act of translation, and translation work is the means by which he will be incarnated into every language and culture.”

If you have wondered about why translating the Bible for people speaking all languages is important, we hope that these resources, as well as Kenney’s article, will help you to be encouraged by the great work of translation that God has done (through his son Jesus) and does (as his word becomes accessible to people around the world).

Convinced that translation is worth it? Partner in sharing God’s story.

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One Response to “What’s the point (of translation)?”

  1. Translation Services says:

    A very informative post which does highlight how diverse translation can be for mankind. As the world these days is more interactive with the accessibility of the internet and many exposure to different languages so a translation tool becomes a service that seems here to stay. I really like the blog keep up the good work.

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